August232014
“Sometimes when I have an original idea, I like to keep it to myself for a while. Giving away the goods or sharing the thought before it’s fully cooked can sometimes reduce your enthusiasm level or incentive to execute the as-of-yet- unveiled brilliance. It’s okay to keep things close to your chest and not share them until you’re ready to do so. Thus, feel free to take those improv classes without telling your coworkers. They might not get it for a while and, for me, disbelief does not translate to motivation.” Life Lesson from Hannah Hart in My Drunk Cookbook (via itssimplysam23)

(via a-bit-fairy-tale)

11AM
mermaidskey:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.
In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 
I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like


I LOVE IT

mermaidskey:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.

In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 

I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like

image

I LOVE IT

(via clubfang)

9AM

(Source: voldermorte, via mischief-dream)

7AM

(Source: kyara-ruiz, via braiker)

August222014
cutie-potoo-ty:

juxi:

jj-homo:

tuxedoronny:

archiemcphee:

Would you care for a tasty shard of glass? Yum!
These completely transparent chips might look like they could cut your mouth to ribbons, but they are actually perfectly edible potato chips. Originally created by Hamid Salimian, Diva at the Met chef, these are perhaps the most curiously normal snacks you will ever see.
Upon closer inspection, the chips are only made from potato starch and stock, which explains the transparency. Instructables user Imnopeas said that “it has the distinct crunch and flavor of a potato chip, but in an unexpected space-age form.”
Here’s the recipe via Instructables. Enjoy making people think you’re either trying to kill them by feeding them glass or preparing them for a trip to the moon!
[via Geekosystem]

FUTURE SNAX

SO TOTALY MAKING THESE OMG

DUDE

cutie-potoo-ty:

juxi:

jj-homo:

tuxedoronny:

archiemcphee:

Would you care for a tasty shard of glass? Yum!

These completely transparent chips might look like they could cut your mouth to ribbons, but they are actually perfectly edible potato chips. Originally created by Hamid Salimian, Diva at the Met chef, these are perhaps the most curiously normal snacks you will ever see.

Upon closer inspection, the chips are only made from potato starch and stock, which explains the transparency. Instructables user Imnopeas said that “it has the distinct crunch and flavor of a potato chip, but in an unexpected space-age form.”

Here’s the recipe via Instructables. Enjoy making people think you’re either trying to kill them by feeding them glass or preparing them for a trip to the moon!

[via Geekosystem]

FUTURE SNAX

SO TOTALY MAKING THESE OMG

DUDE

image

(via a-bit-fairy-tale)

11AM

dpstyles:

cjwho:

Treehouse, Atlanta, USA by Peter Bahouth | via

Architect Peter Bahouth built a series of houses in the trees connected by wooden bridges in Atlanta. Inspired by his love for nature and his childhood memories of boyhood treehouses, environmentalist Peter Bahouth created this grown-up fort in his Atlanta backyard. The three rooms of this treehouse have been named ‘Mind,’ ‘Body’ and ‘Spirit’ by its owner. A suspension bridge connects the living room to the bedroom that includes a platform bed which slides out for a better view of the tree canopy.

Photography: Lindsay Appel

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

Like.  And want.  

(via laughterkey)

9AM

(Source: samdesantis, via laughterkey)

7AM

The Ajanta cave murals: ‘nothing less than the birth of Indian art’

archaeologicalnews:

image

In the early summer of 1819, a British hunting party was heading through thick jungle near Aurangabad, in Maharashtra, western India, when the tiger they were tracking disappeared into a deep ravine. Leading the hunters was Captain John Smith, a young cavalry officer from Madras. Beckoning his friends to follow, he tracked the animal down a semi-circular scarp of steep basalt, and hopped across the rocky bed of the Wagora river, then made his way up through the bushes at the far side of the amphitheatre of cliffs.

Halfway up, Smith stopped in his tracks. The footprints led straight past an opening in the rock face. But the cavity was clearly not a natural cave or a river-cut grotto. Instead, despite the long grass, the all-encroaching creepers and thorny undergrowth, Smith was looking at a manmade facade cut straight into the rockface. The jagged slope had been painstakingly carved away into a perfect portico. It was clearly a work of great sophistication. Equally clearly, it had been abandoned for centuries. Read more.

August212014
mikerugnetta:

It bothered me that none of the Tiny Groot GIF’s loop, so…

mikerugnetta:

It bothered me that none of the Tiny Groot GIF’s loop, so…

(via laughterkey)

11AM

thehammermuseum:

"I love the weather here, its large community of artists, and I like how you can walk around in your pajamas without feeling judged. The city doesn’t offer the best of itself on a platter. It demands your effort to know it."

3 questions with Made in L.A. artist Max Maslansky: http://bit.ly/XnfzoO

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